Missouri CRNA organizes the first “Terry Fox Run Missouri” for Cancer

Missouri CRNA (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist) Terry Martin, residing in Bolivar, has organized the “Terry Fox Run Missouri” to raise money to further advance cancer research.

Terry (CRNA) was born with Spina Bifida. He has had a total of 27 surgeries’ with partial amputations of both feet. When he was a senior in high school in South Dakota he saw stories on the nightly news and in weekly magazines like People and Time. This Canadian young man named Terry Fox was running his “Marathon of Hope”. He (Fox) had lost his right leg to osteosarcoma (AKA) and decided to run across his home country of Canada from East to West – to raise money for cancer research. His plan was to run a Marathon a day, every day, 26 miles on his artificial leg. He had run 3339 miles in 143 days when they discovered his cancer had spread to his lungs. He lost his fight to cancer on June 28th, 1981. As Terry (CRNA) remembers: ”He passed away on my birthday…I turned 19 that day… forever cementing me to him in my mind. At the time of his death I had already had 17 surgeries and although I had not had an amputation yet, I knew deep inside that I would some day. Besides my parents, Terry Fox instilled in me that I could overcome my physical limitations just as he had with hard work and determination – my true “Hero”.”

Terry Fox was a 19-year-old college student when he was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in his right leg. He underwent amputation of his right leg in March of 1977. After training on his artificial leg, he started his “Marathon of Hope” run across Canada on April 12th, 1980. Terry had to stop his run outside of Thunder Bay, Ontario. The cancer had spread to his lungs. Terry continued to battle his cancer until his passing on June 28th, 1981. Terry’s determination, courage, strength, heart and vision continue through the work of the Terry Fox Foundation.

“Even if I don’t finish, we need to continue. It’s got to keep going without me”
“I believe in miracles, I have to” – Terry Fox.

The Terry Fox Foundation (terryfox.org) to this day has raised over $500 million for cancer research. Terry Fox runs are held annually in over 70 countries across the world! This is the FIRST Terry Fox Run in Missouri. We have lost a generation, or two, of people who have never heard of this young man. And, cancer affects everyone. There is not one person alive who has not know a family member, or friend who has had cancer or even had their own battle with cancer.

The run takes place on Saturday, September 28th, 2013 starting at Plaster Stadium on the campus of Southwest Baptist University in Bolivar Mo. It is a 5K or 1K Fun Run/Walk. Registration is from 8-9am and begins at 9:15am. Go to http://terryfoxrunmissouri.org to sign up, donate, or get more information. As per the Terry Fox Foundation regulations, there will be no entry fees, no prizes and the event will not be timed…it is strictly on a donation basis for the runners to participate and give money for cancer research.

Terry Martin has been a CRNA for 21 years. He has proven with hard work, determination, and perseverance that he too was able to overcome his physical limitations. He graduated with his Masters degree from Abbott-Northwestern Hospital/St Mary’s University School of Anesthesia in Minneapolis/St. Paul MN. He currently practices anesthesia at Citizen Memorial Hospital in Bolivar in a 5 CRNA and one part-time anesthesiologist group.

CRNAs (nurse anesthetists) are the primary providers of anesthesia care in rural America, enabling healthcare facilities like Citizen Memorial Hospital to offer patients freedom from pain and facilitate medical treatments from the most common to the life-saving. Nurse Anesthetists are credentialed and licensed to practice all realms of anesthesia services—general anesthetics, local and regional anesthetics, and anesthetics for obstetrics, such as epidurals.

Again, go to http://terryfoxrunmissouri.org to sign up, donate or get more information.

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Intubation/Intubate

Placement of a flexible plastic tube in the trachea to protect and support the airway and allow for mechanical or artificial respiration. This is usually done when the patient is asleep.

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